Schlage deadbolt locks in the U.K.?


(Roger Dunnaker) #1

Hello

Can anyone tell me if Schlage deadbolts will work with Smart Things in the UK


#2

Schlage doesn’t make their Z wave locks on the EU frequency, which is what is used by the EU version of the SmartThings hub. The frequency of the hub and the lock must match exactly, so you cannot import a zwave lock from the US and have it work with the UK hub.

http://products.z-wavealliance.org

The HomeKit version, the Schlage Sense, will work with Apple’s HomeKit in the UK, but does not work with either version of the SmartThings hub.

Yale makes locks on the EU zwave frequency.


(Roger Dunnaker) #3

Thank you for your reply, that is as I thought but just wanted confirming. It’s a great pity, I have use Schlage in the US and think that they are a great lock, in any case, I need a deadbolt and as far as I am aware the Yale locks are just night latches.


(Mark) #4

RThis z-wave deadbolt is on yale’s uk site.

http://www.yale.co.uk/en/yale/couk/productsdb/smart-locks/Keyless-Connected-Smart-Lock/


#5

That looks in the picture just like the US model which is a deadbolt. However, the UK version is not.

Replaces existing rim cylinder used on a 60mm backset nightlatch*

Door locks in the UK are very different from typical residential door locks in the US, in part because of the number of different types of doors in the UK due to the age of some buildings.

Typically, a nightlatch fits on top of the door and the bolt goes into a Metal pocket which is attached to surface of the wall/frame.

This is different from a deadbolt which is interior to the door and goes into the frame.

Notice with the deadbolt there is no corresponding pocket piece, because the bolt goes inside the wall when it is extended.

A deadbolt is considered somewhat more secure than a night latch. However, there are quite a few doors in the UK which don’t allow for drilling into the door/wall itself, so a deadbolt can’t be used.

there are also “deadlocking” Nightlatches, which we don’t have in the US because they would violate the fire safety code in most jurisdictions. With these locks, you can lock the latch with the key and then it cannot be opened unless another key is used. In contrast, in the US, most places require that a residential lock be able to be opened from the inside without a key, specifically to allow for exit in case of a fire.

http://www.nothingbutlocks.com/Night-Latches-Standard-Auto-Dead-Locking-Night-Latches-s/81.htm#axzz4dnp1Yxnv

There is a deadbolt lock made on the EU zwave frequency by vision. it has very low ratings on Amazon.co.UK, but I suspect that’s because people are not familiar with this type of lock. It is sold by Vesternet, and I don’t think they would sell it if it was really very poor quality. But it is being sold as a budget lock, and it’s not very elegant.

http://www.vesternet.com/smart-home/security-1/locks/door-locks

Another option is the Danalock which is a Z wave lock which fits over the turnbolt of an existing deadbolt. You get the same security as the deadbolt because the bolt itself still goes inside the door frame. Reviews of the Danalock first version were not very good, but seem to have improved for the current generation. Make sure you get one on the Z wave frequency that matches your hub. They also make a Bluetooth-only version which doesn’t work with SmartThings.

https://danalock.com/?page_id=35


(Mark) #6

Seems odd that they would list a US lock on their UK website doesn’t it?


#7

I don’t think it is the US lock. I just think it’s the same case. So it looks the same in front on picture, but it is installed differently as the detailed product description on that page explains. Assa Abloy, who own Yale, use a lot of the same case parts throughout the world, but with different lock mechanisms.

Here’s the installation guide for the UK model on that page. You can see that the exterior piece, which is what is shown in the picture, is the same look as the US model. But the interior piece is definitely a surfacemount night latch and installed very differently.

http://mpc.assaabloy.com/yalefile//Fetchfile.aspx?id=25055&dl=1


(Mark) #8

In other words, RTFM!

Thanks for the explanation, as always.