Wall mount display


(Solardave1) #1

I have to make a decision on wall mount displays. I need 4 to 5 to have them placed in a way that makes them useful so cost is obviously a gator. In theory, they will only need to do 2 things, run the ST app and run Blue Iris ip camera software’s client (BI runs on Wintel and they have IOS and Android clients that connect to the Wintel server that actually runs the software. I’m leaning towards the HP slate tablets because they cost around a hundred bucks each and because they have numerous options available for flat mounting on walls easily. Would appreciate any thoughts or experience with a touch pad for this type of application. Thanks.


(Cory S) #2

You could also look into last years Nexus 7s. They will have a better aftermarket for wood cases for wall mounting than the old touch pads. I have a kindle fire mounted on the wall but haven’t got much use out of it because the SmartThings app doesn’t support landscape yet.


(Solardave1) #3

Thanks. I’m trying to make a careful decision since there will be up to 6, maybe more by the time I’m done. I plan to make a wood frame and use a router to make a bezel type of arrangement and then snake the power wire down through the wall so the mounting options aren’t really an issue. I’m really looking for proce/performance and yes, I need landscape as well - I’m cheating now on a large plasma running split screen with video on one side and ST on the other but its kludgy at best. A web portal would make life incredibly easier for what I want to do - I can just open 2 browser windows side by side and I’d be golden.


(ActionTiles.com co-founder Terry @ActionTiles; GitHub: @cosmicpuppy) #4

Nook Tablets are likely a decent choice too, and rapidly falling in price, new or used.

I bought and rooted / ROM’d the first model Nook Color Reader and … still have it.

Worked well, though it’s performance is nothing like Nexus 7. The 8gb should be falling to < $100 on the used market soon.

One cautionary note: The tablets really aren’t designed to be plugged into power constantly. On the Nook, it caused quirks in the touch screen accuracy. Also makes mounting difficult.


(Brian Steere) #5

Personally, I would go for something that is still supported (preferably by the manufacturer) so that future versions of apps still have a chance of running on them. I have a Nook Simple Touch that I chose because I could root it and install other reader apps, but it is stuck on such an old version of Android now that many apps won’t install.