New Wired Window/Door Sensors?


(Phillip D) #1

So I saw some discussions on connecting old security systems with window sensors to SmartThings. But are there newer wired sensors out there that are easier and don’t have all those crazy steps? And closer to feature-parity with something like the SmartSense Multi Sensor?

I’m doing a remodel so I’m going to have walls open. I’d much rather have a wired sensor where I don’t have to worry about batteries if possible. But it seems like most of the wired ones are much simpler and are just a basic magnet. I’d love to also have the vibration to check for glass breaks and such.

Honestly, I’m thinking about wired for a lot of things (lights, motion sensors, etc) but the window ones was where there seemed to be a big difference in what you’re actually getting feature-wise. And the wireless ones were better.


(Ray) #2

I don’t see the advantage of wired sensors unless you have an old security system already installed and want to integrate with ST or want to use the old switch. Well unless you are building a new house of course and have access for running new wires. Yes it’s cheaper with just a bunch of magnetic sensors hooking up to a z-wave sensor at the panel but you won’t get vibration, temp etc… Also you will get more option for mounting location. The battery life on the ST multi is prettygood. After 1.5 years and I still have around 35%.


(Phillip D) #3

Even if it lasts a while, I’d still rather avoid 50 new things in the house that I’ll have to change batteries on quasi-regularly. I was hoping there were some options that included the new sensors but had wired power.


(DLee) #4

At least for motion sensors with USB ports you could position USB outlets near mount locations. I’ve been using usb/plug outlets near the bed and another in the kitchen. Great for charging things and keeping lamps plugged in. No big ugly USB plug adapter.

If I were building or remodeling, I’d consider this or straight USB outlets for motion sensor mounding locations. Would need really short USB cables. Check amp requirements etc for your devices. I’d also put one of these to replace a normal wall outlet in almost every room. I expect USB power standard will last for a while.


(Phillip D) #5

Even the USB one is hard. USB Type-C is now shipping in real computers. It’s going to be in a lot of devices soon. And it’s a completely new incompatible port.

But you also can’t future-proof everything. And the standard USB we all know and love will be around for a long time to come.


#6

Wireless is the new standard because it’s less expensive to deploy, potentially more secure, and fits the moving door model better.

The more secure thing is based on the idea that even though the hub is still a point of failure, it’s now the only significant point of failure. In wired installations, every wire has multiple ways of going bad, most inside places where repairs are difficult.

I understand the desire to not change batteries. I’m in a wheelchair with limited hand function, so it’s not high on my favorites list.

I just have somebody come in twice a year for two hours and change all the batteries, including smoke detectors and emergency flashlights. Total cost is still cheaper than a single in wall wire repair would be. The removed batteries go into the supply we use for the easy to change stuff like TV remotes and game controllers. :zap:

My Monday health aide also recharges all the rechargeables every week.

I learned about putting battery maintenance on a fixed schedule when I was working as a network engineer, and I’m always amazed how many problems it prevents. :blush:


(Phillip D) #7

Personally, it’s not the level of work so much as the waste I’d love to be able to avoid. But it sounds rather unavoidable unless I go with inferior products. And honestly, I guess all the lights/light switches/power plugs won’t need batteries so it’s mostly the door and windows things. That’s not too bad. My house isn’t gigantic.

And scheduling it really does make sense. Especially when you can then re-use those batteries in other things. Though honestly, I’ve got very few things that do need batteries at the moment.