Advice on Smart Lock vs RFID?


(Chris) #1

I have a property which is a holiday rental. I have ST sensors on doors & ST PIRs but only really use it to kill my Aircon if doors are left open and see how long the cleaners spend in each room!

I would like to create a basic alarm but need some way to arm/disarm it. Eventually I could link to a keyless lock. I don’t want to use presence sensors and as renters change weekly using phones with the app is also out

One thought was to use a separate RFID reader inside and out to activate a switch which ST could then detect and arm/disarm but I wondered if it would be possible to use the lock for this too.

The manual isn’t clear if ST can detect the difference between a keypad entry vs closing the deadlock from the inside. Clearly I don’t want the system armed (as away) when the deadlock is thrown from the inside, but if I could set to HOME when the code is entered and the lock unlocks, and AWAY when the code is entered and the lock locks, then I could avoid RFID completely

Second question (for those of your using locks) - does ST get the identity of the keypad code? so by giving different codes to my agent, cleaner and guests, can ST tell who has entered the code and unlocked the door?

Any alternative suggestions (eg a Zwave keypad etc) welcome

Thanks for any help!

Chris


(Don) #2

I have a Schlage be469 lock. Using @RBoy DTH and smart app. It can identify who unlocked the door. With actions per user. Lots and lots more.

Start here if you want more information about that:

Here is a discussion about the dth:


(www.rboyapps.com - Make your home your butler!) #3

The stock ST device handler can’t but the one shared by @TN_Oldman can tell the difference

Again, the stock ST handler can do this to a limited extent for some locks. The Universal DH above expands the scope and coverage/events for more locks. It can tell the difference between internal lock, external lock, keypad lock, remote lock and correspondingly the different types of unlocks as well.


(Chris) #4

Thanks I already took a look at the link and think it is the way to go! Any suggestions on which lock is the best one to go with (for reliability and features)? I think I still want one with a key override as ST can still be flaky and I don’t want guests locked out when I’m 3000 miles away!

Chris


(Don) #5

The Schlage lock I have has a key over ride. They probably all do if you go with the motorized type. (In case battery dies) the only time we have needed the key was when a different family member could not remember his code.

I have this model:

You just have to be sure the deadbolt is lined up well , no resistance. It has worked every time with @RBoy software. Is easy to program, setup, pick options remotely.


(www.rboyapps.com - Make your home your butler!) #6

Schlage BE469 and Yale YRd240 are great locks. Each one has a pro depending upon what you want. If you want configurable auto lock then Yale has an edge of you want a built in tamper alert/alarm then Schalge has the edge.


(Chris) #7

Thanks both - I already guessed I’m going to need some carpentry to get the lock better aligned which will probable take longer than installing the new lock!

Now if you could just get ST to talk to Nest without IFTTT …


(Don) #8

I didn’t have to do much. Just shifted plate a little. Drill and was done. Was easy to instal. Not really harder than regular deadbolt. I just made sure after it was in I could actuate deadbolt with minimum effort.


(Don) #9

Do you mean Nest thermostat or protect? I believe there is custom DTH for both. One that does both and one just for protects. I have 2 protects and can see their status in smarthings.


(Chris) #10

It’s the thermostat - I knew there was a custom DH for it but I’m nervous about installing it remotely because I’m in the UK so can’t reset my Hub or Nest (both in USA) if it bricks it …I just wish ST would put better handlers in so that things work as they should “out of the box”. The problem with community development (in principle not anyone specific) is that sometimes they are very buggy and developers often get bored and give up on them (which is why monetization is so important)