2018 Samsung Button Stops Working

Anyone have an issue where the new Samsung Button seems to get stuck asleep after a couple of days? Removing it from its’ battery, placing it back and waiting for the light to turn off seems to fix it but that doesn’t seem ideal.

Thanks

Mine is very reliable. How’s your zigbee mesh? How far from the hub is it?

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About 15 feet. I have sensors further away that seem fine though.

Zigbee sensors? Do you have any zigbee repeaters?

Yes and not between the button and the hub. Really have been pro z-wave but I finally bought a zigbee plug in module so my zigbee light on the porch would work better.

I just find it weird that a battery reseat triggered reboot makes it behave better for a couple of days.

Make sure your ST hub isn’t too close to your Wi-Fi router

Mine is very reliable (it takes a second or two to respond occasionally).
V2 hub, no Zigbee repeater.

This is interesting as I get a number of devices that are Zigbee and they fail to receive their command.
My ST hub is very close to my router, so thinking this may be the cause of these failed commands.
What distance would you recommend between my ST hub and my router?

I think recommendation is 2m, but any distance would help. Also might check that your zigbee and WiFi channels are not overlapping.

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This FAQ might be helpful:

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Thanks for this help.
Could definitely help in the WAF war that I’ve been losing recently!

FYI I’ve heard this debunked by many signal industry experts.

Most say that for most residential and commercial situations proximity really doesn’t matter.

Pick your belief, try what works.

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Not sure about the band overlap with wifi…have to confirm what frequencies they are on.
Easy to shift the Hub mind…might give that a whirl and report back.
Unless anyone knows otherwise, Zigbee in the EU (as I’m in UK) is 868MHz, so way out of Wifi 2.4Ghz or 5Ghz.
Although Zigbee in other countries does use the 2.4Ghz band!
Thanks.

You’re thinking of z-wave. Zigbee is 2.4 ghz worldwide.

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Are you sure?
This was my source (for EU):

http://www.rfwireless-world.com/Terminology/zigbee-channels.html

100% positive
https://www.silabs.com/products/wireless/mesh-networking/z-wave/benefits/technology/global-regions

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Think we’re talking at cross purposes :slight_smile:
I’m referring to Zigbee in the UK (EU) region.

As am I. Look at the z-wave frequency for CEPT in my link. The website you linked is confused.

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It looks like there are some non-SmartHome related uses for zigbee that use a different frequency. As far as home automation goes, all devices are 2.4 ghz.

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As a network engineer and former field tech, I’d like to see the names and quotations for those experts. Because I’ve never seen it debunked, and I stay pretty up to date on the technical literature in this area. :sunglasses:

There are some zigbee device manufacturers who say you are not likely to run into trouble, but that’s hardly the same thing as debunking it.

All the field techs so I know follow standard industry guidelines for deployment to avoid the interference problems. And there have been plenty of studies which published the numerical measurable effects of distance and interference.

https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/abstract/document/5672592

https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/6996634

https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7023954

https://ieeexplore.ieee.org/document/7118712

If you’re saying that anecdotally there are lots of people who put a Wi-Fi router right next to a zigbee hub and still have an acceptable quality of service, sure. Everything depends on the exact local conditions, including the directions the antennas are pointing since even though these are Omnidirectional signals, they do spread as they move out from the point of origin. And whatever objects are around that might cause bounce back.

Will those same people probably have even better performance if they separated the two transmitters? Likely yes, but not better enough that people living in the house would necessarily notice.

There’s no harm in trying it one way, and if the results are acceptable to you, then just not worrying about it. But that’s not the same thing as “debunking” a practice based on a measurable physical event.

Submitted with respect.

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