"The dryer has turned off"

I don’t usually hear the dryer off buzzer. Now Alexa notifies me. I had an X10 dryer power notifer years ago on my gas dryer. Since I now have an all electric dryer, I had to do things differently. I figured there are three ways I can do this. Since you have to put the power sensor over only one 220v conductor, you can split the power cord. I didn’t like that idea. You can pull the dryer out and take the back off, then attach the sensor to where it’s pig tailed in. Or you can do what I did, just pull the hot wire out of the breaker and put it through the sensor.
Works great. FYI

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Disclaimer: I recommend you have an electrician do this. If you do this yourself always think every second where you put your hands. Very dangerous if you’re not careful.

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I remember when my electrician father-in-law taught me to work in a panel. Step 1 was to take one hand and stick it in your belt behind you. If you couldn’t do it one handed, hire an electrician.

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Good price on that switch

I’ve had some trouble with contact sensors, missing about 2 in 50 events (on or off).

Wireless temperature sensor in the exhaust duct, can update for each 1-2 degree change, which can drive a webcore for alexa, since you probably don’t want to be notified of every degree change. In my case when the dryer is back down to 120F or less, then it’s done. The temp stream also helps supervise the device function - if it disappears for a day then maybe check the battery.

I normally use the plug meter reading to drive notification.

pretty hard to do the wirenuts that way.

Maybe he’s talking about hot work which is almost 100% unnecessary

I just stuck a Samsung multi-purpose sensor on the back of my dryer and it works great. The vibration of the dryer keeps the vibration sensor active while running and stops when it stops.

A smart plug with power metering and WeCoRE does the trick here…

It was an old panel with no master breaker