Is Samsung being evil?

If you’ve got a Samsung Smart TV you’re undoubtedly perplexed at the inability to control your TV with SmartThings. They’re both Samsung devices. Both devices also have Smart in their name which is indicative of being…Smart.

From a technical prospective it’s possible for SmartThings to control a Samsung Smart TV. I’m not taking about controlling smart home devices from the TV, simply being able to power on and off the TV would suffice.

This begs the question, why hasn’t Samsung built integration between the two devices? I can only speculate as to the reason but here’s a few things to keep in mind.

SmartThings used to have a device handler for Samsung Smart TV’s but it has since been removed. The device handler was also removed from their public github repo.

Samsung is developing a dongle for their latest lineup of TV’s that allows for controlling home devices.

My theory is that Samsung is being evil. In other words, Samsung can, and in fact had integration between SmartThings and Smart TV’s but has since removed it for political purposes.

So I ask the community, is Samsung being evil or is there a perfectly innocent explanation for this lack of functionality?

My own guess, which is purely a guess, is that they aren’t going to release television integration until SmartThings is stable. And until it can handle the scale of the television customers signing onto the SmartThings cloud.

I don’t think it’s evil. I think it’s a very appropriate desire to protect the television buyers market from any frustration with what is supposed to be a value add feature.

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I think you misunderstood. I’m referring to current gen Samsung Smart TV’s.

That’s like saying they’re not going to sell anymore sensors until the platform is stable. We’re talking about a device handler.

You’re right, I’m frustrated at the fact that I paid more for the value added Smart TV feature when I could have simply purchased a non smart Samsung TV. You have it backwards, those of us who’ve bought into the Samsung ecosystem feel cheated at the fact integration is being withheld for what appears to be political reasons.

If you suspect a particular product strategy is the result of a “evil” business strategy then you have to, please, at least speculate as to: How does this benefit Samsung financially and/or competively? And: Is this benefit the result of deliberate overzealous, aggressive, illegal or deceitful actions?

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What do you mean by “political reasons”?

Surely Samsung is more likely to capture customer loyalty and market share with integration than without. So I lean towards belief that they are not confident in their ability to integrate… yet.

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CES is just around the corner. I guess we’ll find out soon enough if Samsung is still vested in SmartThings or they’ve decided to write it off. I venture to say that circumstantial evidence points to the latter, but we shall see.

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[quote=“imcdona, post:1, topic:69637”]
My theory is that Samsung is being evil. In other words, Samsung can, and in fact had integration between SmartThings and Smart TV’s but has since removed it for political purposes.[/quote]

I’d say that the terms “evil” and “political purposes” don’t have any relevance to the subject.

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You’re completely conflating two things. Just because they both have ‘smart’ and ‘Samsung’ associated with them, no that doesn’t mean anything to be honest, at least not to me.

Anyway, there was a very good reason why the original DTH/SA was removed for Samsung Smart TV’s and that was because it was no longer being developed in that form, throwing horrendous amounts of errors on the platform and later, in some instances (i.e. mine at least) it had gotten so outdated and bad it could actually consistently cause my ST hub to reboot any time I told a routine to turn of my 2013 Smart TV.

Also keep in mind on < 2015 TV’s it’s actually currently completely impossible to turn ON the TV via any means other than IR. Control for 2015, 2016 and I’d imagine 2017 TV’s is coming I believe but has been a little delayed. For now if you want control, I’d highly recommend Harmony.

As @tgauchat mentioned, things got in the way that was more important and as for other comments I’d actually prefer it if Samsung distanced themselves from ST because it causes unnecessary confusions and assumptions like this. Of course it would be nice if ST could keep Samsung sized budgets at the same time.

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There are not adding integration for MANY things for nothing but marketing, legal, and business purposes. There is no technological reason it cant be done.

Ive had this discussion before. Fanboys will come up with excuse after excuse, but its all BS.

Again… to what marketing benefit is it to defer integration???

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They are going to rebrand it integrate it I to the TVs. Therefore, they are assigning resources elsewhere.

They are planning on integrating it as far as I understand, it’s just not going to have the hub built in and the extend dongle is only for those 2016 TV’s that DO have the hub built in (SUHD models, UHD ones do not) and again, if you already have an ST hub, it doesn’t matter anyway. They’re not going to force everyone who wants to use ST to only be able to buy the hub that is integrated into the TV.

Um, what? I don’t understand any of that.

Don’t kid yourself. Integration between SmartThings and a Samsung TV is trivial. As I mentioned previously, integration was working but has since been removed.

It’s not like the TV isn’t powered when it’s powered off, hence the ability to power on the TV with the remote. From a network prospective there’s WOL (wake on lan) which has been around for years and is a mature tried and tested technology. This isn’t rocket science.

As I’ve previously mentioned, and others have speculated, I believe Samsung wants us to buy a 2016 model TV with a special dongle. That’s the definition of evil.

[quote=“imcdona, post:14, topic:69637, full:true”]Don’t kid yourself. Integration between SmartThings and a Samsung TV is trivial. As I mentioned previously, integration was working but has since been removed.

It’s not like the TV isn’t powered when it’s powered off, hence the ability to power on the TV with the remote. From a network prospective there’s WOL (wake on lan) which has been around for years and is a mature tried and tested technology. This isn’t rocket science.

As I’ve previously mentioned, and others have speculated, I believe Samsung wants us to buy a 2016 model TV with a special dongle. That’s the definition of evil.
[/quote]

Your oversimplification of this tends to indicate you don’t a full understanding of what’s involved and you decided to ignore the fact that:

  1. I explained why the old DTH/SA was removed.
  2. I said they don’t currently support being turned on. Is it possible? Maybe, and I already mentioned WoL.

You lot are arguing about the lack of integration on Samsung products that were around a LONG time before SmartThings was probably even glimmer in Samsung’s eye. There is no conspiracy here.

Finally, once again, the dongle is ONLY for the Samsung 2016 TV’s that have the ST hub BUILT IN, this is ONLY on the 2016 SUHD TVs. The dongle is also free to those who DO have a 2016 SUHD TV. Why the hell would Samsung/SmartThings force someone who already has an ST hub to by a TV just so they could integrate it. You’re not making sense.

I can tell you from the perspective of someone who works for a large consumer electronics company, everything that happens with products and features is not intentional, planned or, even desired by the company.

Features and products can be more difficult to make work properly and/or together than expected, unexpected technical issues arise, internal priorities and budgets across business units shift, there are just many reasons why things don’t come out the way you (or the company/business unit) would expect/want them to.

I don’t know the specifics on this case, but my general experience leads me to assume it’s more likely that much of the issues are that they have their knickers in a bunch. :slight_smile:

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That’s the definition / example of “planned obsolescence”.

I won’t comment on the moral implications, but it is an extremely common business practice.

Apple iPhone headphone jack, for example?

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Why not just get a harmony hub and have full ck tell of all your devices? Otherwise get a $35 Chromecast thst can turn on and off the TV.

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[quote=“imcdona, post:14, topic:69637”]
I believe Samsung wants us to buy a 2016 model TV with a special dongle. That’s the definition of evil.[/quote]

Words fail me.

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I purchased a Harmony Ultimate a few days ago and as I was positioning the IR sensors I couldn’t help but notice how ridiculous it was I had to resort to a “Rube Goldberg” for what should have been a straightforward integration. Meanwhile my Samsung Smart TV is on my network with an IP address. sigh…:pensive:

Your point being the reason we don’t have integration is due to technical issues. Point taken. However, prior to opening this thread I spoke to ST support about Samsung Smart TV integration and when asked if the reason was politics the support person, not obliged to reveal the reason, did indicate they were leaning heavily that way without saying it outright. They certainly didn’t mention anything technical.

Personally I believe it’s a mix of what @Danabw mentioned and or planned obsolesce as @tgauchat mentioned.

Evil Corporation

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I work directly w/support personnel on a variety of issues, and should caution that support agents:

  1. Are typically not informed about, and specifically asked not to comment regarding future product plans, as those frequently change/morph and you’d end up with misinformed customers.
  2. Are typically outsourced/remotely located and less connected to development teams than in the past
  3. Make things up. Yup…this does happen! There is great pressure on them to have something to say to make the customer feel like they are being helped/informed.
  4. Get things wrong even if they were informed - they’re people, they make mistakes.
  5. Have tremendous turnover, resulting in constant supply of newbies with limited experience

So I would take anything a support person says about future plans, or reasons why features were left out, removed, etc. (i.e., anything outside of direct problem troubleshooting) with a grain of salt.

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