Looking for solutions: Z-wave control for existing exhaust fan


(Sam Roza) #1

Subject says it all I think:

I have 2 bathroom fans that my many children like to leave on for hours at a time. I’m looking to add a switch or relay or whatever else might be applicable, in order to shut the fans off on a timer.

I’m not real knowledgeable on hardware for smartthings, so looking for expert help. I find solutions like various z-wave switches, but then I am never sure if they are appropriate for the load. Also was looking at this: http://homeseer.com/pdfs/Aeon%20Labs/MicroSwitch26103.pdf But again: can’t tell if it’s the right solution.

Thanks!


(John C) #2

Some will say this isn’t “smart” enough, but it gets the job done for me. As @JDRoberts would say, “Choice is good!”

Although it is lo-tech, you may be happy enough with a simple solution such as this…

Pass & Seymour RT1WCCV4 Seven Button Timer 120-volt Ac 1/6 Horse Power Easy Installation, White https://www.amazon.com/dp/B003GVGJ3C/


#3

I went with the rotary style, but there’s one bathroom where they don’t even turn on the fan! You enter and it’s like a sauna inside GRRRR, I think that one calls for a smart switch with and a humidity sensor.


(Jimmy) #4

that micro switch should work, as will any on/off z-wave switch. just no dimmers.


#5

I have GE on/off zwave switches in all my bathrooms controlling everything, including exhaust fans.

Besides being controlled manually, they’re also controlled based on humidity levels, or turned off when motion detection has stopped. I did try to use the feature to turn off after a certain period of time, but I prefer the methods I just described.


(Sam Roza) #6

All good answers. Thanks a lot, gentlemen.

I know the low-tech options are out there, but it sort of makes my St setup pointless. So was looking to integrate.


(Robin) #7

For the purposes of a simple on/off switch, what you linked to will work fine. Don’t attempt to connect a regular smart dimmer, though, as they are usually incompatible with fan motors.

Then just setup a piston in CoRE to sync with the bathroom light / humidity etc.


(Sam Roza) #8

I think I will just install a ge 12730 fan switch. Simple, relatively affordable.

Thanks for all the advice.


#9

If they are bathroom exhaust fans you need just the on/off switch (12722 or 12727) not the Fan Control Switch (12730) which is for ceiling fans.


#10

I used these controllers on my switches for the exhaust fans in all my bathrooms.

Aeon Labs DSC26103-ZWUS - Z-Wave In-Wall Micro Controller

I then used SmartRules to create a logic that turns the exhaust fans off after 45 minutes of being turned on. Figured 45 minutes was long to clear out the steam or any rose smell. I also did the same for the light in the toilet closets.


(Matthew Valeri) #11

I do the exact thing.

I have an Everspring sensor that reports humidity. I tucked it on top of a shelving unit out of sight (but next to the shower).

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0078FD8FY/ref=asc_df_B0078FD8FY5015304/?tag=hyprod-20&creative=395033&creativeASIN=B0078FD8FY&linkCode=df0&hvadid=194003459169&hvpos=1o1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=17388940540853154582&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9001827&hvtargid=pla-313676911439

Then I replaced the switch that controls the fan with a zwave switch. Using Core, when the humidity rises above a threshold the fan turns on, when it drops below a threshold the fan turns off. Pretty basic operation.


(Sam Roza) #12

Thank you for the correction.


#13

FYI do not get dimmable switches. They don’t work for a fan and for lights the lag is way to slow. The family will hate it.