Hardwiring Motion/Multipurpose Sensors?


(MacTechGenius) #1

Anyone hardwire the motion and/or multipurpose sensor? It’s unfortunate the new motion sensors lacks a USB port.
I bought another house (2nd smartthings location) that is prewired for alarm (two wires) at each door/window and along the walls for motion. All wires go back to a centralized location thus I could possibly use a CCTV like power supply to send the appropriate voltage. How would I connect it to the smartthings sensor? Solder it to the terminal???

Thanks


#2

You can find project reports from people who have done this kind of project on the quick browse lists in the community – created wiki in the project report section under “power.” :sunglasses:

http://thingsthataresmart.wiki/index.php?title=How_to_Quick_Browse_the_Community-Created_SmartApps_Forum_Section#Quick_Browse_Links_for_Project_Reports.2FQuestions

Do be aware that anything that requires soldering will likely void the warranty on that particular device.


(MacTechGenius) #3

Appreciate the response, this is the closest thing that I found: 3v Step Down Converters for Sensors

Any alternative to soldering?


#4

Existing hard wired alarm might be able to be modified to be seen by smartthings. As JD mentioned, take a look at the wiki. Here is an example of one that was done with an esp8266, which is very inexpensive.


#5

The Aeotec multi sensor has a USB power option.

Other than that, if you don’t want to solder you would have to look for a dummy battery option, but they aren’t usually made in that size.


#6

Maybe you had more than one question. My last response was for connecting hard wired alarm to ST.

As far as just a battery operated motion sensor, you could always just buy a 3.3v wall plug, cut the end off, and hook the wires to where the battery would normally go. I tape up the a dead battery to hold the wires in place so it requires no soldering.

Totally diy and would void any kind of warranties.


(MacTechGenius) #7

I am using this solution at my current house and it works great! But at my 2nd location, I would rather just use SmartThing’s sensors since they are the most reliable solution, at least in my experience.


(MacTechGenius) #8

In my experience the Aeotec sensors haven’t really been reliable and I had two that failed on me.


(MacTechGenius) #9

This looks great! Can you still put the cover back one? I suppose I could use a large power supply like this and connect all the sensors??

https://www.aliexpress.com/store/product/Factory-Sales-Power-Supplier-DC-3V-60A-180W-Switching-power-supply-For-LED-Light-Strip-Display/1260220_32281717528.html


#10

As long as your voltage is constant, around 3v, then I think that should work, but I can not confirm that.

Yes the cover fits back on this one without any modifications. Doesn’t look great, but I’m sure I could get a better fit modifying it a bit with a drimmel, and have it come out the back.


(Nate Clark) #11

Instead of using the SmartThings wireless sensor, I would just get an inexpensive wired PIR motion sensor for about $20 and use my nodemcu-smartthings esp8266 project to hook it to SmartThings. You can power it with any 12V transformer. Much cheaper and you never have to worry about batteries.


(Robin) #12

I strongly reccomend against this!

The existing dead battery is not-rechargeable and there are no charge protection circuits… ever seen a lithium battery catch fire? Not fun!!


#13

Guess I should have been more specific. I tape up the battery all the way around/ top and bottom with electric tape so that it doesn’t contact the wires and gets no current. It just holds the wires in place.


(John C) #14

Further on @JDRoberts recommendation: my two installations have a total of four Aeon multi-sensors all running on USB power. I use iPhone charger blocks for the power, but you could easily use existing wiring from a central location if you’re comfortable with soldering and making cables.

FWIW, my sensors have all been very reliable. No issues since initial deployment. YMMV, of course :grin:


#15

There are dummy batteries made for this purpose out of appropriate materials. They’re easy to find in a AA size, but not so easy in other sizes. You can make your own out of nonflammable nonconducting plastics, but that’s a whole other issue.

I would definitely agree with @RobinWinbourne on this – – using a dead battery is very likely to lead to problems long-term as there are still chemicals inside that battery which will eventually leak. Better to go with something that is inert.


#16

Use a wooden dowel, cut to length.

J


(Michael) #17

I posted about this as well. I include a few pictures and a link to a useful YouTube video: