Device tags, AllJoyn


(Scott Slack) #1

Can you tag your supported devices with the protocols that each supports, so that I can search on a tag, such as AllJoyn, or BLE?


#2

Right now the only protocols supported by smartthings are zwave, zigbee, and some individual IP addressable devices or cloud to cloud services.

There’s no direct support for BLE, allJOYN, thread/weave, homekit, x10, power line, Ademco 433, Lutron clear connect, IR, or anything else, although occasionally individual community members come up with some kind of hardware/software bridge, often involving an Arduino or raspberry pi interceptor.

So you see individual device discussions based on what somebody has done on their own, but officially it’s zigbee (Home Automation 1.2 profile) or Zwave for now.

SmartThings does have an IFTTT channel, which allows for indirect integration with a lot of devices.

Individual topic authors can now add tags to their subject lines, which would be a good idea.


(Scott Slack) #3

It looks like Insteon has AllJoyn support. I think AllJOYN is important after I received a presentation from Qualcomm at the Hardware Startups meeting. http://www.meetup.com/Seattle-Hardware-Startups/events/224761102/ There will be a plugfest at the conference. http://events.linuxfoundation.org/events/allseen-alliance-summit/extend-the-experience/alljoynplugfest


#4

Insteon is working very closely with Microsoft, alljoyn is Microsoft’s on ramp into Internet of things, so insteon is going to come out with an alljoyn hub.

That said, that doesn’t mean that every insteon device will work with AllJoyn. Insteon also recently came out with a home kit-compatible hub. And they have a couple versions of their own “Insteon protocol” only hub.

You have to check all their stuff carefully to see exactly what works and what. They don’t have a single hub that works with everything.

I think Alljoyn looks like a decent protocol, so does weave, so does homekit. None are fully baked yet, or have very many devices available.

My own guess, and it’s purely a guess is that by the summer of 2016 there will be several reasonably priced mostly plug-and-play DIY home automation systems out there to evaluate. For right now, it’s hard to predict who the winners and losers will be.