Z-wave Long Range spec

In some far future version of the hub…

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backward-compatible with both existing Z-Wave networks and previously installed Z-Wave devices

Could be cool… :sunglasses:

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I wonder: usually, in wireless transmissions, you need both the device and the hub to support the increased range for proper two-way communication.

That is, an LR hub has the power to reach a non-LR device, but the non-LR device’s older / shorter range radio doesn’t have enough power to reach the hub. Like a loud voice talking to a quiet voice; the quiet voice can hear the loud voice, but the quiet voice still can’t respond back to the loud voice.

The PR doesn’t go into much detail, but my current assumption is that both the hub & the device need to have LR support. It’ll be backwards-compatible, but not have long-range support.

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Not exactly. The point of backwards compatibility as we have had in all previous generations is that since this is a mesh network, as long as the older device is in range of a repeater, all the devices can coexist on the same network. If a particular hop is long range to long range, we can take advantage of that. But you could have a long range device within the shorter distance communicate successfully with a short range device. that still counts as “backwards compatible.“

That’s how it works now for the fifth generation (zwave plus) and the older third and fourth generations (zwave classic). You can mix and match these on the same network. But you obviously only get the longer range for a hop if the device at each end is capable of that distance.

Z wave from the beginning specifically has not wanted people to have to buy new light switches in order take advantage of a newer generation hub.

My guess is the firmware will be updated on the older devices to allow for networks with more than 232 IDs, but the difference in transmission strength won’t matter, again as long as there is some device within single hop range of the older devices. :sunglasses:

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Oh, yes. I believe we agree.

ikjadoon: Both the hub & the device need to have LR support. It’ll be backwards-compatible, but not have long-range support.
JDRoberts: If a particular hop is long range to long range, we can take advantage of that. … But you obviously only get the longer range for a hop if the device at each end is capable of that distance.

To clarify my first post perhaps with an example: standard Z-Wave can do 20 feet and Z-Wave LR can do 60 feet. I’m looking at an end device that isn’t in range:

standard device ----30 ft----> standard repeater / hub = :x:
standard device ----30 ft----> LR repeater / hub = :x:
LR device ----30 ft----> standard repeater / hub = :x:
LR device ----30 ft----> LR repeater / hub = :white_check_mark: (aka two loud voices)

Adding an LR repeater 25 feet away from a non-LR device (20 ft limit) unfortunately still means no connection, even if the repeater can itself push 60 feet.

Agreed on compatibility. That’s definitely a huge blessing to avoid two meshes.

As you mention, LR repeaters -> longer hops, so you can really stretch out those four hops to some pretty massive distances.

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