Doorbell

This actually works for you? I just got a nearly identical reed sensor and it doesn’t pick up the field change at all.Did you do anything special?

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Yea, been working for over a year.
I used an external reed sensor so I could mount it right to the side of the doorbell coil, the reed switch axis parallel to the coil .

Thanks for this idea, @Mike_Maxwell! This did indeed turn out to be super easy. The trickiest part was knocking out the hole for the external sensor wires and figuring out exactly how to insert the wires in the Monoprice sensor.

Alas, I can’t fit it inside the cover, because the contact sensor is just a little too long to fit between the chime plates and too long to fit in any other direction. For now, it’s sitting on top of the cover. The wall is light colored, so it’s mostly unobtrusive.

The New SkyBell HD is here and our new IFTTT Channel has launched: http://goo.gl/cYVclE

With SkyBell HD, you can start, view and record live video from the SkyBell HD at any time. You can do it from the app or any of the IFTTT/SmartThings devices can trigger SkyBell HD to turn on and start recording.

SkyBell HD also records when the motion sensor is triggered, even if you don’t answer it.

SkyBell HD is the same size as SkyBell 2.0, yet is a major improvement across the board.

Some other nice things about SkyBell HD:
–Full color night vision
–Free cloud recording and activity history so you can watch video later
–Up to 1080p camera without the fishbowl or periscope effect
–Made in the USA
–You can turn off your indoor chime from ringing (good for quiet time, sleeping babies and napping dogs!)
–On-demand video
–New Wi-Fi chip for faster performance and B/G/N support
– You can customize the color of the LED button
– Works with Nest



I liked your approach, but noticed the clatter of the relay when the doorbell was activated, and suspect, over time, the DC relay does not like the low AC voltage coming from the transformer. Just a thought, adding a AC to DC full wave rectifier between the relay and the solenoid might keep it alive. I am by no means and expert in this area, and invite others with a better understanding to comment.

Something like this?
http://www.qualifiedhardware.com/brands/adams-rite/4603-rectifier-2294.cfm?vfsku=2294&vfsku=2294&gpla=pla&gclid=Cj0KEQiAno60BRDt89rAh7qt-4wBEiQASes2tbEjx1bBkFWtW3M29TnQeNn4MWfCoDomJGaWVoxVwAEaAkz78P8HAQ

Or just pick up an AC relay. I’ve been running this fella for a year. Have my transformer tapped to 16vac, which is enough potential to light the lighted door button without triggering the relay till the button is pushed.

I like it! I does seem silly we have to jump through these hoops just to retrofit a doorbell device. Heck, a power source is right there. There must be millions of homes where the solutions discussed in this thread apply. I find it surprising there is not a specific device designed to address a very common need . . .

I went with the relay approach. However some folks will press the button too quickly and it doesn’t register. The relay is closing but it seems either the contact has some sort of threshold before it reports or ST isn’t registering such a quick hit. Any suggestions?

WAF!!!

@mobious, I went the relay route with an Ecolink like you, but with this relay:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B008MU206C?psc=1&redirect=true&ref_=oh_aui_detailpage_o03_s00

It’s been bulletproof since last March when I first set this up. The relay is very small, and is fast, even when the doorbell is quickly pressed. This is what I’d recommend using.

Looks like this:

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@johnconstantelo Before I plop down the $5 fortune for these relays, can you confirm that you’re definelty using 12v DC relays for a 16v AC doorbell?

I ignored these relays earlier in the post because the current relay seemed like a better match for my setup. I do like the smaller relays because I can actually cut a space in the resonator chamber of the doorbell and stuff it in there.

Not knocking @Mike_Maxwell 's solution either just figured the relay approach was a little less hack’ish.

Hi @mobious, I didn’t have anyone around here right now to easily help me with this, but I was able to tape down the doorbell button and use my voltmeter across the terminals before the tape gave way. I read 14v AC at the meter.

Good enough for me! Thanks.

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Malthus great stuff. OK so I used the idea that mike came up with and installed a monoprice sensor with a reed device. Works great, it originally showed as open and then when the doorbell is rung it shows as closed for a moment. This shows it is physically working right. After this I installed your device type (for some reason I see two doorbell device types?) maybe i did something wrong. I went ahead and then edited the monoprice sensor device in ide from a zwave open/closed sensor to a doorbell device (per your code). I successfully get an orange ding dong status. When the door bell is then physically pressed I get a no guests greyed out status. However if I toggle this a couple of times I can get the doorbell to settle on the “no guests status”, and then if i press the doorbell again it goes to the orange ding dong status. So it seems I did something wrong as depending on the number of times I press it I can change the orange status to gray and back to orange. Did I do something wrong here? Thanks for writing this code btw!!

Seems like the 4th time u press the button it turns to gray again and then another 4 times. The intermidiate times it stays orange in the ding dong mode. I dont write code so I am unable to tell which toggle leads to this.
Thanks in advance. (btw i took care of the double device issue, now I only have one door bell device listed)

If anyone is interested…

I actually ended up trying the various solutions mentioned in this thread. Here are my personal findings and opinions on each. Spoiler alert, go with the magnetic contact.

I started with the 24v AC relay because I wanted something that wasn’t so “hack’ish”. I wanted to hardwire everything in and make it look/feel like a factory solution. This relay wasn’t loud, a slight click could be heard if you wanted to listen for it, but the solenoid and chime action masked it. The problem with this one is it’s mechanical, which means quick button presses were often missed because the coil wouldn’t be energized long enough to complete a full “throw” of the relay. It successfully handled the average “ring”…I’m just very anal and a little OCD.

I then tried this 12V DC Relay. All doorbells that I know of are 16v AC. Being that others had used this relay with success I gave it a whirl, I had nothing to lose, the cost of the components was peanuts. Oh God the buzzing! With every ring of the doorbell the buzz of the relay could be heard. It sounded like those buzzer/horns on the kids rides at the fair/carnival. This relay was a little quicker in terms of catching the quick hits on the doorbell button. The buzzing however was unbearable.

I finally decided to give @Mike_Maxwell’s magnetic contact approach a try. This turned out to actually be the most elegant solution of all. There’s fewer moving parts (just a reed switch) and as it turns out is the most responsive if you mount the contact correctly.

My advice? Skip the relays… go with the magnetic contact.

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I’m not sure how many here are also reading the Nexia Doorbell Sensor thread, but after a quick test, it looks like the DB100Z may be just the device I was looking for to receive notification from a conventional doorbell. So far I’m pretty happy with it.

Here how I hooked mine up with a Aeon Labs Aeotec Z‑Wave Dry Contact Sensor, Gen5 ZW097. From the comments, I totally have this Dry Contact hooked up the wrong way, but it’s been working for over a month now without any issue.

https://community.smartthings.com/t/easy-doorbell-integration/41326

This solution works perfectly for me. I used an Aeotec dry contact (https://amazon.com/gp/product/B0155HSUUY), and a simple magnetic contact (https://amazon.com/gp/product/B0009SUF08). I attached the contact to the solenoid housing using the self-adhesive, connected it to the z-wave dry contact sensor and paired with the Smartthings hub. Even a quick press of the doorbell button works.

If you have a wired doorbell system, you cannot wire the Aeotec (or any other dry contact sensor) in parallel with the transformer. These systems keep a small current running at all times and then change the current when the doorbell is pressed. So the dry contact sensor will ALWAYS consider the doorbell button pressed. And IT WILL BURN OUT YOUR TRANSFORMER.

Yeah, it’s AC in, AC out. Just stepped down from 110V to 24V (usually). Sometimes 12V.

You can’t wire a dry contact in parallel with the transformer because these systems keep a small current running at all times and then change the current when the doorbell is pressed. So the dry contact sensor will ALWAYS consider the doorbell button pressed. And IT WILL BURN OUT YOUR TRANSFORMER.

Some people have a DIGITAL door bell with a little speaker to make the ding-dong sound. Those systems will allow you to connect a dry contact sensor with no problem. If yours has a solenoid that moves a rod to strike a chime or plate, you cannot wire the contact sensor directly.

This solution works perfectly for me: I used an Aeotec dry contact (https://amazon.com/gp/product/B0155HSUUY), and a simple magnetic contact (https://amazon.com/gp/product/B0009SUF08).

The solenoid is an electromagnet. So when triggered, it will act like a magnet, which the magnetic sensor (same type as used on your window) will detect.

I attached the contact to the solenoid housing using the self-adhesive, connected it to the z-wave dry contact sensor, and then paired it with the Smartthings hub. Even a quick press of the doorbell button works.

It appears that the “Aeon Labs Aeotec Z‑Wave Dry Contact Sensor, Gen5 ZW097” is no longer available. Can anyone suggest an suitable alternative? I’m actually looking to connect to my Furnace Fan at the control board which is 24VAC.